Spam and Pornos and Scams -- oh my!


 

Brenda,

#1 on my list of damages done by yesterday's changes is the apparent loss of the Pending Approvals page, from the Management menu.

Concurrent with that was the change of my group (GMF) from moderated to unmoderated. I assume they did likewise to other formerly moderated groups.

So this is the new model of Yahoo Groups? They are to be effectively Open Relays where malevolent members can transmit any sort of content they wish? Groups (like GMF) with formerly open membership numbering in the thousands might have a lot of lurking members who might "perk up" if they realize they have an open line to the membership.

It didn't happen in GMF - I noticed and was able to reset the group to moderated messages. And I am (so far) able approve/reject messages by email from the MODERATE notices. But email moderation alone is less than satisfactory - there's no ability to edit a message or to send it back to the member with a request that they edit it. Nope, by email it is all or nothing.

I've tweeted @YahooCare and got back a form tweet (there's such a thing!) telling me to read SLN31010 - the very help page I'd cited in my tweet.
https://twitter.com/ShalFarley/status/1207113173561569280

My worry is that the Pending Approvals page wasn't collateral damage, but was actually part of a vision to remove moderation as an admin function; leaving Yahoo Groups vulnerable to abuse.

The counter-argument is that they also removed open membership. Meaning that an admin can remove someone who abuses the group, and that address won't be able to rejoin without moderator approval. But how many junk messages were distributed to the membership before a mod notices? It could be many hours for part-time mod teams! And you know crooks, they generate email address by the boatload and all it takes is a moderator's momentary misjudgement and it starts all over again (no more New User Moderation if you can't moderate at all).

So, this is an unexpected development (unexpected by me anyway), and IMO a very bad one.

Shal


Kat/Selina
 

You are definitely right about that.  Before the 12/14 change, I had a group that I admined where each new member had to be vetted in. Back in the day, doing this cut down the amount of spam immensely.  One thing I feel is a big difference between a full on mailing list and what we had with Yahoo Groups (before October of this year) was the power of taking things back.  What I mean is, back in the day, if someone posted to the board and then realized that maybe they didnt want to say that...they could press delete on their post.  The only people they couldnt stop from the message reaching was those who had set their Yahoo notifications to Immediate email.

With a mailing list, you cant do any of that.  If you are a moderator and something gets posted that is against your rules, there is no way to remove it by pulling up that conversation thread and deleting it.  Even if there was, its guaranteed that the message will go to every member on the list (because you can only set your notifications to "Individual Email" or "No Email").  This limitation is heaven for a spammer.


David Halfpenny
 

Absolutely, Shal !

I’m afraid it’s part of a sly trend: I’ve noticed other monetised platforms remove the requirement for applicants to make a statement before being approved.
So we just approve everyone on trust and take the consequences later.

David 1/2d

On 18 Dec 2019, at 02:33, Shal Farley <shals2nd@...> wrote:

Brenda,

#1 on my list of damages done by yesterday's changes is the apparent loss of the Pending Approvals page, from the Management menu.

Concurrent with that was the change of my group (GMF) from moderated to unmoderated. I assume they did likewise to other formerly moderated groups.

So this is the new model of Yahoo Groups? They are to be effectively Open Relays where malevolent members can transmit any sort of content they wish? Groups (like GMF) with formerly open membership numbering in the thousands might have a lot of lurking members who might "perk up" if they realize they have an open line to the membership.

It didn't happen in GMF - I noticed and was able to reset the group to moderated messages. And I am (so far) able approve/reject messages by email from the MODERATE notices. But email moderation alone is less than satisfactory - there's no ability to edit a message or to send it back to the member with a request that they edit it. Nope, by email it is all or nothing.

I've tweeted @YahooCare and got back a form tweet (there's such a thing!) telling me to read SLN31010 - the very help page I'd cited in my tweet.
https://twitter.com/ShalFarley/status/1207113173561569280

My worry is that the Pending Approvals page wasn't collateral damage, but was actually part of a vision to remove moderation as an admin function; leaving Yahoo Groups vulnerable to abuse.

The counter-argument is that they also removed open membership. Meaning that an admin can remove someone who abuses the group, and that address won't be able to rejoin without moderator approval. But how many junk messages were distributed to the membership before a mod notices? It could be many hours for part-time mod teams! And you know crooks, they generate email address by the boatload and all it takes is a moderator's momentary misjudgement and it starts all over again (no more New User Moderation if you can't moderate at all).

So, this is an unexpected development (unexpected by me anyway), and IMO a very bad one.

Shal





Elizabeth McKenzie
 

Shal, I think the new model is they don't want us at all.  The way they're keeping the Groups open now seems to be a twist of the knife.  I was able to change two of my groups back to messages and photos moderated.  One of them I wasn't able to change either messages or photos to moderated.  One of them no longer shows at the top of my list of groups, although it still shows the blue crown, but that wasn't the one I couldn't change.

Elizabeth

On Tue, Dec 17, 2019 at 9:33 PM Shal Farley <shals2nd@...> wrote:
Brenda,

#1 on my list of damages done by yesterday's changes is the apparent
loss of the Pending Approvals page, from the Management menu.

Concurrent with that was the change of my group (GMF) from moderated to
unmoderated. I assume they did likewise to other formerly moderated groups.

So this is the new model of Yahoo Groups? They are to be effectively
Open Relays where malevolent members can transmit any sort of content
they wish? Groups (like GMF) with formerly open membership numbering in
the thousands might have a lot of lurking members who might "perk up" if
they realize they have an open line to the membership.

It didn't happen in GMF - I noticed and was able to reset the group to
moderated messages. And I am (so far) able approve/reject messages by
email from the MODERATE notices. But email moderation alone is less than
satisfactory - there's no ability to edit a message or to send it back
to the member with a request that they edit it. Nope, by email it is all
or nothing.

I've tweeted @YahooCare and got back a form tweet (there's such a
thing!) telling me to read SLN31010 - the very help page I'd cited in my
tweet.
https://twitter.com/ShalFarley/status/1207113173561569280

My worry is that the Pending Approvals page wasn't collateral damage,
but was actually part of a vision to remove moderation as an admin
function; leaving Yahoo Groups vulnerable to abuse.

The counter-argument is that they also removed open membership. Meaning
that an admin can remove someone who abuses the group, and that address
won't be able to rejoin without moderator approval. But how many junk
messages were distributed to the membership before a mod notices? It
could be many hours for part-time mod teams! And you know crooks, they
generate email address by the boatload and all it takes is a moderator's
momentary misjudgement and it starts all over again (no more New User
Moderation if you can't moderate at all).

So, this is an unexpected development (unexpected by me anyway), and IMO
a very bad one.

Shal




David Halfpenny
 

Absolutely, Kat! D1/2d

On 18 Dec 2019, at 02:46, Kat/Selina via Groups.Io <catwoman69y2k@...> wrote:

You are definitely right about that.  Before the 12/14 change, I had a group that I admined where each new member had to be vetted in. Back in the day, doing this cut down the amount of spam immensely.  One thing I feel is a big difference between a full on mailing list and what we had with Yahoo Groups (before October of this year) was the power of taking things back.  What I mean is, back in the day, if someone posted to the board and then realized that maybe they didnt want to say that...they could press delete on their post.  The only people they couldnt stop from the message reaching was those who had set their Yahoo notifications to Immediate email.

With a mailing list, you cant do any of that.  If you are a moderator and something gets posted that is against your rules, there is no way to remove it by pulling up that conversation thread and deleting it.  Even if there was, its guaranteed that the message will go to every member on the list (because you can only set your notifications to "Individual Email" or "No Email").  This limitation is heaven for a spammer.


Nightowl >8#
 

Shal -- gather all the info on this from people that you can. How late will you be up tonight? I need to talk to you on here or Twitter about it.

Brenda

On 12/17/2019 8:33 PM, Shal Farley wrote:
Brenda,
#1 on my list of damages done by yesterday's changes is the apparent loss of the Pending Approvals page, from the Management menu.
Concurrent with that was the change of my group (GMF) from moderated to unmoderated. I assume they did likewise to other formerly moderated groups.
So this is the new model of Yahoo Groups? They are to be effectively Open Relays where malevolent members can transmit any sort of content they wish? Groups (like GMF) with formerly open membership numbering in the thousands might have a lot of lurking members who might "perk up" if they realize they have an open line to the membership.
It didn't happen in GMF - I noticed and was able to reset the group to moderated messages. And I am (so far) able approve/reject messages by email from the MODERATE notices. But email moderation alone is less than satisfactory - there's no ability to edit a message or to send it back to the member with a request that they edit it. Nope, by email it is all or nothing.
I've tweeted @YahooCare and got back a form tweet (there's such a thing!) telling me to read SLN31010 - the very help page I'd cited in my tweet.
https://twitter.com/ShalFarley/status/1207113173561569280
My worry is that the Pending Approvals page wasn't collateral damage, but was actually part of a vision to remove moderation as an admin function; leaving Yahoo Groups vulnerable to abuse.
The counter-argument is that they also removed open membership. Meaning that an admin can remove someone who abuses the group, and that address won't be able to rejoin without moderator approval. But how many junk messages were distributed to the membership before a mod notices? It could be many hours for part-time mod teams! And you know crooks, they generate email address by the boatload and all it takes is a moderator's momentary misjudgement and it starts all over again (no more New User Moderation if you can't moderate at all).
So, this is an unexpected development (unexpected by me anyway), and IMO a very bad one.
Shal


Nightowl >8#
 

I've tried to condense the things you've said and tweeted them by DM to the board member who was communicating with me.

This is really bad, right? I mean, Verizon and Yahoo are now the same company, so this problem would leave Verizon vulnerable also. Man. what a mess. Well, I have a more important message to tweet and e-mail out tonight.

Brenda


Nightowl >8#
 

One more thing. What I tried to do was close my group for posting. Then I saw someone post, so that's what didn't work for me. I did it correctly, didn't I? I selected those little circle choices that you showed me once and set it to Mods only could post.

Then someone posted.

Brenda


 

So, if all they did was hide the file and photo pages from the groups they belonged to, which is what I think they actually did, couldn’t a programmer write an app that would go in and un-hide them?

On Dec 17, 2019, at 9:33 PM, Shal Farley <shals2nd@gmail.com> wrote:

Brenda,

#1 on my list of damages done by yesterday's changes is the apparent loss of the Pending Approvals page, from the Management menu.

Concurrent with that was the change of my group (GMF) from moderated to unmoderated. I assume they did likewise to other formerly moderated groups.

So this is the new model of Yahoo Groups? They are to be effectively Open Relays where malevolent members can transmit any sort of content they wish? Groups (like GMF) with formerly open membership numbering in the thousands might have a lot of lurking members who might "perk up" if they realize they have an open line to the membership.

It didn't happen in GMF - I noticed and was able to reset the group to moderated messages. And I am (so far) able approve/reject messages by email from the MODERATE notices. But email moderation alone is less than satisfactory - there's no ability to edit a message or to send it back to the member with a request that they edit it. Nope, by email it is all or nothing.

I've tweeted @YahooCare and got back a form tweet (there's such a thing!) telling me to read SLN31010 - the very help page I'd cited in my tweet.
https://twitter.com/ShalFarley/status/1207113173561569280

My worry is that the Pending Approvals page wasn't collateral damage, but was actually part of a vision to remove moderation as an admin function; leaving Yahoo Groups vulnerable to abuse.

The counter-argument is that they also removed open membership. Meaning that an admin can remove someone who abuses the group, and that address won't be able to rejoin without moderator approval. But how many junk messages were distributed to the membership before a mod notices? It could be many hours for part-time mod teams! And you know crooks, they generate email address by the boatload and all it takes is a moderator's momentary misjudgement and it starts all over again (no more New User Moderation if you can't moderate at all).

So, this is an unexpected development (unexpected by me anyway), and IMO a very bad one.

Shal


Nightowl >8#
 

Shal: Permission to put this post up on theblog as a result of the change?
Brenda

On 12/17/2019 8:33 PM, Shal Farley wrote:
Brenda,
#1 on my list of damages done by yesterday's changes is the apparent loss of the Pending Approvals page, from the Management menu.
Concurrent with that was the change of my group (GMF) from moderated to unmoderated. I assume they did likewise to other formerly moderated groups.
So this is the new model of Yahoo Groups? They are to be effectively Open Relays where malevolent members can transmit any sort of content they wish? Groups (like GMF) with formerly open membership numbering in the thousands might have a lot of lurking members who might "perk up" if they realize they have an open line to the membership.
It didn't happen in GMF - I noticed and was able to reset the group to moderated messages. And I am (so far) able approve/reject messages by email from the MODERATE notices. But email moderation alone is less than satisfactory - there's no ability to edit a message or to send it back to the member with a request that they edit it. Nope, by email it is all or nothing.
I've tweeted @YahooCare and got back a form tweet (there's such a thing!) telling me to read SLN31010 - the very help page I'd cited in my tweet.
https://twitter.com/ShalFarley/status/1207113173561569280
My worry is that the Pending Approvals page wasn't collateral damage, but was actually part of a vision to remove moderation as an admin function; leaving Yahoo Groups vulnerable to abuse.
The counter-argument is that they also removed open membership. Meaning that an admin can remove someone who abuses the group, and that address won't be able to rejoin without moderator approval. But how many junk messages were distributed to the membership before a mod notices? It could be many hours for part-time mod teams! And you know crooks, they generate email address by the boatload and all it takes is a moderator's momentary misjudgement and it starts all over again (no more New User Moderation if you can't moderate at all).
So, this is an unexpected development (unexpected by me anyway), and IMO a very bad one.
Shal


 

Brenda,

Permission granted.

Shal


On Tue, Dec 17, 2019 at 8:54 PM Nightowl >8# <nightowl713@...> wrote:
Shal: Permission to put this post up on theblog as a result of the change?
Brenda

On 12/17/2019 8:33 PM, Shal Farley wrote:
> Brenda,
>
> #1 on my list of damages done by yesterday's changes is the apparent
> loss of the Pending Approvals page, from the Management menu.
>
> Concurrent with that was the change of my group (GMF) from moderated to
> unmoderated. I assume they did likewise to other formerly moderated groups.
>
> So this is the new model of Yahoo Groups? They are to be effectively
> Open Relays where malevolent members can transmit any sort of content
> they wish? Groups (like GMF) with formerly open membership numbering in
> the thousands might have a lot of lurking members who might "perk up" if
> they realize they have an open line to the membership.
>
> It didn't happen in GMF - I noticed and was able to reset the group to
> moderated messages. And I am (so far) able approve/reject messages by
> email from the MODERATE notices. But email moderation alone is less than
> satisfactory - there's no ability to edit a message or to send it back
> to the member with a request that they edit it. Nope, by email it is all
> or nothing.
>
> I've tweeted @YahooCare and got back a form tweet (there's such a
> thing!) telling me to read SLN31010 - the very help page I'd cited in my
> tweet.
> https://twitter.com/ShalFarley/status/1207113173561569280
>
> My worry is that the Pending Approvals page wasn't collateral damage,
> but was actually part of a vision to remove moderation as an admin
> function; leaving Yahoo Groups vulnerable to abuse.
>
> The counter-argument is that they also removed open membership. Meaning
> that an admin can remove someone who abuses the group, and that address
> won't be able to rejoin without moderator approval. But how many junk
> messages were distributed to the membership before a mod notices? It
> could be many hours for part-time mod teams! And you know crooks, they
> generate email address by the boatload and all it takes is a moderator's
> momentary misjudgement and it starts all over again (no more New User
> Moderation if you can't moderate at all).
>
> So, this is an unexpected development (unexpected by me anyway), and IMO
> a very bad one.
>
> Shal
>
>
>
>





 

Not too late, as I was up at 5:45 this morning. About 10pm now, expecting another busy day tomorrow.

Shal

On 2019-12-17 7:45 PM, Nightowl >8# wrote:
Shal -- gather all the info on this from people that you can. How late will you be up tonight? I need to talk to you on here or Twitter about it.
Brenda
On 12/17/2019 8:33 PM, Shal Farley wrote:
Brenda,

#1 on my list of damages done by yesterday's changes is the apparent loss of the Pending Approvals page, from the Management menu.

Concurrent with that was the change of my group (GMF) from moderated to unmoderated. I assume they did likewise to other formerly moderated groups.

So this is the new model of Yahoo Groups? They are to be effectively Open Relays where malevolent members can transmit any sort of content they wish? Groups (like GMF) with formerly open membership numbering in the thousands might have a lot of lurking members who might "perk up" if they realize they have an open line to the membership.

It didn't happen in GMF - I noticed and was able to reset the group to moderated messages. And I am (so far) able approve/reject messages by email from the MODERATE notices. But email moderation alone is less than satisfactory - there's no ability to edit a message or to send it back to the member with a request that they edit it. Nope, by email it is all or nothing.

I've tweeted @YahooCare and got back a form tweet (there's such a thing!) telling me to read SLN31010 - the very help page I'd cited in my tweet.
https://twitter.com/ShalFarley/status/1207113173561569280

My worry is that the Pending Approvals page wasn't collateral damage, but was actually part of a vision to remove moderation as an admin function; leaving Yahoo Groups vulnerable to abuse.

The counter-argument is that they also removed open membership. Meaning that an admin can remove someone who abuses the group, and that address won't be able to rejoin without moderator approval. But how many junk messages were distributed to the membership before a mod notices? It could be many hours for part-time mod teams! And you know crooks, they generate email address by the boatload and all it takes is a moderator's momentary misjudgement and it starts all over again (no more New User Moderation if you can't moderate at all).

So, this is an unexpected development (unexpected by me anyway), and IMO a very bad one.

Shal




Nightowl >8#
 

This works. I was thinking, we should make this a page of it's own and warn people on the blog. Anything you come up with about this issue please send to me, ok? I'm also going to warn people on Twitter...and believe me, I'm telling Verizon about this.

Brenda

On 12/18/2019 12:06 AM, Shal Farley wrote:
Not too late, as I was up at 5:45 this morning. About 10pm now, expecting another busy day tomorrow.
Shal
On 2019-12-17 7:45 PM, Nightowl >8# wrote:
Shal -- gather all the info on this from people that you can. How late will you be up tonight? I need to talk to you on here or Twitter about it.

Brenda

On 12/17/2019 8:33 PM, Shal Farley wrote:
Brenda,

#1 on my list of damages done by yesterday's changes is the apparent loss of the Pending Approvals page, from the Management menu.

Concurrent with that was the change of my group (GMF) from moderated to unmoderated. I assume they did likewise to other formerly moderated groups.

So this is the new model of Yahoo Groups? They are to be effectively Open Relays where malevolent members can transmit any sort of content they wish? Groups (like GMF) with formerly open membership numbering in the thousands might have a lot of lurking members who might "perk up" if they realize they have an open line to the membership.

It didn't happen in GMF - I noticed and was able to reset the group to moderated messages. And I am (so far) able approve/reject messages by email from the MODERATE notices. But email moderation alone is less than satisfactory - there's no ability to edit a message or to send it back to the member with a request that they edit it. Nope, by email it is all or nothing.

I've tweeted @YahooCare and got back a form tweet (there's such a thing!) telling me to read SLN31010 - the very help page I'd cited in my tweet.
https://twitter.com/ShalFarley/status/1207113173561569280

My worry is that the Pending Approvals page wasn't collateral damage, but was actually part of a vision to remove moderation as an admin function; leaving Yahoo Groups vulnerable to abuse.

The counter-argument is that they also removed open membership. Meaning that an admin can remove someone who abuses the group, and that address won't be able to rejoin without moderator approval. But how many junk messages were distributed to the membership before a mod notices? It could be many hours for part-time mod teams! And you know crooks, they generate email address by the boatload and all it takes is a moderator's momentary misjudgement and it starts all over again (no more New User Moderation if you can't moderate at all).

So, this is an unexpected development (unexpected by me anyway), and IMO a very bad one.

Shal






 

Brenda,

Quick review:

1) Yahoo switched groups with moderated messages to unmoderated.

1a) This is bad for those groups because some groups have large membership and are moderated for a reason - to avoid distributing spam and other objectionable content.

1b) This is bad for all Yahoo Group users because when YG's outbound servers gain a reputation for distributing junk they end up on blacklists or with poor reputation scores - impairing the delivery of Yahoo Group messages to all Yahoo Groups users

1c) This is bad for Verizon because (1b) gives Verizon a reputation for incompetent management of its services.

2) The Pending Approvals page for messages gives an error ("The item you are looking for is not available").

2a) This is bad for group moderators because they are forced to moderate solely by email, which for many is inconvenient or impossible.

2b) This is bad for groups because web moderation allowed correction of messages (Edit) or return to the sending member with a note of explanation, or rejecting the message as Spam. Moderation by email has none of those options.

2c) The help page "Understand what's changing in Yahoo Groups" (SLN31010) says that admins will continue to have limited access to administration tools. The Pending Approvals page is an essential administration tool and should not be eliminated.

3) Items 1 and 2 are bad for groups because Moderation, especially as applied to new members or those prone to inappropriate posting, is an essential Admin responsibility to maintain a group's reputation for good quality messages (no spam, no phishing, no exploits, no abuse).

3a) These are bad for Verizon because many group Admins may give up in frustration and close their groups because the only other option would be to leave them unmoderated. This will give Verizon's services a bad reputation for poor user loyalty and poor user retention.

Shal

On 2019-12-17 11:01 PM, Nightowl >8# wrote:
This works. I was thinking, we should make this a page of it's own and warn people on the blog. Anything you come up with about this issue please send to me, ok? I'm also going to warn people on Twitter...and believe me, I'm telling Verizon about this.
Brenda
On 12/18/2019 12:06 AM, Shal Farley wrote:
Not too late, as I was up at 5:45 this morning. About 10pm now, expecting another busy day tomorrow.

Shal


On 2019-12-17 7:45 PM, Nightowl >8# wrote:
Shal -- gather all the info on this from people that you can. How late will you be up tonight? I need to talk to you on here or Twitter about it.

Brenda

On 12/17/2019 8:33 PM, Shal Farley wrote:
Brenda,

#1 on my list of damages done by yesterday's changes is the apparent loss of the Pending Approvals page, from the Management menu.

Concurrent with that was the change of my group (GMF) from moderated to unmoderated. I assume they did likewise to other formerly moderated groups.

So this is the new model of Yahoo Groups? They are to be effectively Open Relays where malevolent members can transmit any sort of content they wish? Groups (like GMF) with formerly open membership numbering in the thousands might have a lot of lurking members who might "perk up" if they realize they have an open line to the membership.

It didn't happen in GMF - I noticed and was able to reset the group to moderated messages. And I am (so far) able approve/reject messages by email from the MODERATE notices. But email moderation alone is less than satisfactory - there's no ability to edit a message or to send it back to the member with a request that they edit it. Nope, by email it is all or nothing.

I've tweeted @YahooCare and got back a form tweet (there's such a thing!) telling me to read SLN31010 - the very help page I'd cited in my tweet.
https://twitter.com/ShalFarley/status/1207113173561569280

My worry is that the Pending Approvals page wasn't collateral damage, but was actually part of a vision to remove moderation as an admin function; leaving Yahoo Groups vulnerable to abuse.

The counter-argument is that they also removed open membership. Meaning that an admin can remove someone who abuses the group, and that address won't be able to rejoin without moderator approval. But how many junk messages were distributed to the membership before a mod notices? It could be many hours for part-time mod teams! And you know crooks, they generate email address by the boatload and all it takes is a moderator's momentary misjudgement and it starts all over again (no more New User Moderation if you can't moderate at all).

So, this is an unexpected development (unexpected by me anyway), and IMO a very bad one.

Shal








Joan nyc/az.
 

hi, I don't understand their thinking on any of this.  why do they say a person can start a new group? who would want to with this system.????  just venting. 
Like everything else yahoo has done, why are we surprised by any of their stupid actions.
Probably the ones who made discissions  (sorry) sp. check .  has no clue how groups worked. how serious subjects and issues groups even involved.   



 

Brenda,

Well, Yahoo seems to have doubled-down on the no moderation policy.

I wrote:

1) Yahoo switched groups with moderated messages to unmoderated.
I switched GMF back to moderated, but now the Moderation tab is missing from the Control Panel. So either GMF is now permanently moderated, or they'll sweep through again and switch it to unmoderated, permanently.

Moreover, on each member's Edit Member page the Posting Privileges selection offers only:
Default Group Policy
Override - can't post messages.

Which is amusing, as one can no longer change the Group Policy.

It appears that all of the members have been switched to Default Group Policy, with the possible exception of any who were set to can't post (I don't know if I have any members who were set that way).

So I guess going forward if a member misbehaves a mod's only option is to give them a time-out (can't post) or just remove them.

I sure hope you can talk some sense in them with regards to the value of moderators and moderation.

Shal


Nightowl >8#
 

Shal Farley wrote:> Brenda, Well, Yahoo seems to have doubled-down on the no moderation policy....<<

Yeah, I'm having a lot of problems in MM. I can relate.

Shal wrote:>>I switched GMF back to moderated, but now the Moderation tab is missing from the Control Panel. So either GMF is now permanently moderated, or they'll sweep through again and switch it to unmoderated, permanently.<<

Shal wrote:>>> Moreover, on each member's Edit Member page the Posting Privileges selection offers only:
Default Group Policy
Override - can't post messages.<<

YIKES! Can you still see what the Default Group policy is???

Shal wrote:>>> Which is amusing, as one can no longer change the Group Policy. it appears that all of the members have been switched to Default Group Policy, with the possible exception of any who were set to can't post (I > don't know if I have any members who were set that way).<<

They are really starting to piss me off, Shal....

Shal wrote:>>So I guess going forward if a member misbehaves a mod's only option is
to give them a time-out (can't post) or just remove them. I sure hope you can talk some sense in them with regards to the value of moderators and moderation.<<

I'm not even TRYING to talk to the ones I've been talking to. I'm going to contact EVERY SINGLE Verizon employee I can, every single shareholder I can find, and every single board member I can find and tell them Verizon is causing us SERIOUS security issues.

Already have a reporter on the malware part of this with the GMD, and I only managed to write 7 reporters last night before I was falling asleep. And get this, the FIRST one I wrote called me when he saw my Security Post on the blog. Have you seen that yet? He's talked to the archivers also. ;)

Verizon does not know who it is messing with, when they started finally messing with me. I'm so mad about the cover photo images and etc. gone from our About pages, when they promised us that would stay. Not that I trusted them, but I'm still a bit shocked they took down our pictures and messed with our descriptions.

I was being very nice and cooperative, I even politely warned them overnight via leaving them a message from my Line 2 phone which they had NOT blocked yet, (Yes, they've blocked line 1), that they had a serious security issue on their hands, and that I felt they should know. That was the right and honorable thing to do. However, they have had their last chance with me to work together to handle this.

Now I'm going to handle it my way.

Brenda
Nightowl >8#


 

Brenda,

YIKES! Can you still see what the Default Group policy is???
Maybe.

The home page Group Settings still says "Messages require approval.", but that may be just old info - it also still says "This is a public group" and "Membership does not require approval", neither of which is true now, owing to their changes (not mine).

The actual Moderation tab is gone, so you can't see it there.

Already have a reporter on the malware part of this with the GMD, ...
I'm not as concerned about the malware detection as you are. Partly because nothing has been detected in any of my groups' downloads, but mostly because I think any threats that are detected are likely to be decades-old malware, which has likely been patched against in any modern system.

Also, you may point out that the mbox files are likely to be safe: they don't contain attachments. There could be detections for HTML threats, and for links to bad sites, in the mbox files, but I think the risks from those are very minimal to a modern system. The trojan apps and other more serious malware would be in the Photos_and_attachments folder, if anywhere.

The same old rule for email attachments applies: if you don't know who it came from and what it is, don't open it.

Shal


Nightowl >8#
 

On 12/19/2019 10:09 AM, Shal Farley wrote:>>I'm not as concerned about the malware detection as you are. Partly because nothing has been detected in any of my groups' downloads, but mostly because I think any threats that are detected are likely to be decades-old malware, which has likely been patched against in any modern system.<<

I wasn't trying to get the reporter about the malware, so it wasn't that I was concerned. In fact, the e-mail I wrote the reporter was before we knew about the security issues. I had written 7 reporters about them finally hiding our archives (because some had said to keep them posted), and then I posted the security post mainly to warn users about the possible threat in their downloads.

Then next thing I knew, (I had given my phone number to the 7 reporters), the reporter called me and asked me about all kinds of things, then wanted to talk to the archivers, and I got him in touch with them.

I'm more concerned with not being able to regulate our groups, and being open to serious problems because of it.

Brenda


Also, you may point out that the mbox files are likely to be safe: they don't contain attachments. There could be detections for HTML threats, and for links to bad sites, in the mbox files, but I think the risks from those are very minimal to a modern system. The trojan apps and other more serious malware would be in the Photos_and_attachments folder, if anywhere.
The same old rule for email attachments applies: if you don't know who it came from and what it is, don't open it.
Shal